The Celestyal Crystal

IMG_0370If you were around Montego Bay last week and you were monitoring channel 16 on the VHF you would have heard the following conversation:

Celestyal Crystal, Celestyal Crystal, Celestyal Crystal, this is sailing vessel Nomad, Nomad, over.

Silence, some nervous waiting and then an answer:

Sailing vessel Nomad, this is Celestyal Crystal, over.

Celestyal Crystal, this is sailing vessel Nomad, please go to channel seven one, over.

This is Celestyal Crystal, go to channel 10, one zero, over.

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Whaou je suis fière !

IMG_6918Les semaines, les mois se succèdent. Notre Nomad nous amène dans des coins fabuleux et nous avons cette chance folle de découvrir des pays riches en couleurs et de faire des rencontres qui nous marquent et nous font grandir.

Avec nos pas de parents, nous découvrons ces nouvelles îles, ces nouveaux continents. Nous passons de l’anglais à l’espagnol, au créole, au papiamento, au français en apprenant de nouvelles expressions canadiennes telle la crème glacée, ou t’en veux tu ? La Colombie nous parlera aux doux sons de « mi amor » alors que depuis quelques jours en Jamaïque nous sommes tous des « Ya man »

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Montego Bay

IMG_0342It is Thursday evening and Nomad is tied to a dock in Montego Bay Yacht Club. Two days ago when we left Port Antonio we had other plans. Yes, we headed to Montego Bay but we wanted to get there only on Saturday to be on time to welcome our friends Claire and Jack. We planned on short day-sails from one small bay to another. Enjoying clear waters and calm anchorages on the way. Free anchorages. We had enough of marinas and mooring balls we

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Moore Town and Nanny Falls

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We met Deja in the marina. He is one of the two lifeguards in the near by beach. Like many other Jamaican he offered to take us on a tour. He offered to bring us to Moore town and the Nanny falls. But unlike all the others, he said he wont charge us anything. He wanted to show us his country and teach us a thing or two about Jamaica’s history. We thought it would be a great first opportunity to travel inland accompanied by a local guy. It will allow us to learn how to Continue reading

Jamaica – Port Antonio

IMG_0082It is now seven days already that we are tied to a mooring ball in the beautiful bay of Port Antonio – a small and not so quite town on the eastern side of the north coast of Jamaica. Apart from walking around the town and its lively market, chatting with the local rasta people, doing school, swimming in the bay and the pool of the marina and eating jerk chicken we did not do much during this first week in Jamaica.

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5 Bays

IMG_9204After being so long on the roads it was great to be back at the boat. We missed our little chez nous. But some things we did not miss, for example, the heat and the humidity of the marina. On some days it is not even 7 o’clock in the morning and we are already sweating and you can hear us complaining how hot it is. Its so hot you don’t feel like doing anything except sitting in the captain’s lounge or going to the bathrooms – the two places in the marina where you have air-conditioning. At anchor most of the time we have a little Continue reading

San Gil

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Everyone goes to San Gil for its extreme sports scene – paragliding, mountain biking, rafting, bungee jumping, you name it. We spent our time in a very mundane and not at all extreme way – going to the local market, cooking our meals, playing chess, having interesting conversations with our Swiss guesthouse owner and the other travelers, going for a stroll in the tropical park next to the river, and just enjoying our time.

The hostel we booked via booking.com was nice but not for Continue reading

Colombian Love

IMG_20171110_172150It is our second time on the American continent. For us, travelling in the last half a year in small dry and flat islands of the Bahamas and the ABC, South America had a lot of appeal. Mountains, rivers, tropical forests, deserts, culture, fruits, vegetables. We found out it had even more.

 

When we traveled in the States we always had the feeling of a

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Paramo de Oceta – a walk on a different planet

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We never heard the word paramo before. Paramo is a tropical high altitude ecosystem. You find it between the tree-line and the permanent snow. It a very important ecological ecosystem not only because of its unique flora and fauna but mainly as as source fresh water.

Paramo de Oceta is about 10 km walk from the little village of Mongui, at altitude of 2950 meters, known for its fabrication of foot-balls. It is only 10 km away but it is a world apart. When we reached the Paramo we felt as if we entered a different planet.

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